SCYON Abstract

Received on: 21 10 2022

The role of rotation on the formation of second generation stars in globular clusters

Authors:E. Lacchin 1,2,3, F. Calura 1, E. Vesperini 4, A. Mastrobuono-Battisti 3
Affiliations:(1) INAF - OAS, Osservatorio di Astrofisica e Scienza dello Spazio di Bologna, Bologna, Italy; (2) Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy; (3) GEPI, Observatoire de Paris, PSL Research University, CNRS, Meudon, France; (4) Department of Astronomy, Indiana University, Bloomington, USA
Accepted by: Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
URL:https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2022MNRAS.517.1171L/abstract

By means of 3D hydrodynamic simulations, we explore the effects of rotation in the formation of second-generation (SG) stars in globular clusters (GC). Our simulations follow the SG formation in a first-generation (FG) internally rotating GC; SG stars form out of FG asymptotic giant branch (AGB) ejecta and external pristine gas accreted by the system. We have explored two different initial rotational velocity profiles for the FG cluster and two different inclinations of the rotational axis with respect to the direction of motion of the external infalling gas, whose density has also been varied. For a low (10$^{-24}$ g cm$^{-3}$) external gas density, a disk of SG helium-enhanced stars is formed. The SG is characterized by distinct chemo-dynamical phase space patterns: it shows a more rapid rotation than the FG with the helium-enhanced SG subsystem rotating more rapidly than the moderate helium-enhanced one. In models with high external gas density (10$^{-23}$ g cm$^{-3}$), the inner SG disc is disrupted by the early arrival of external gas and only a small fraction of highly enhanced helium stars preserves the rotation acquired at birth. Variations in the inclination angle between the rotation axis and the direction of the infalling gas and the velocity profile can slightly alter the extent of the stellar disc and the rotational amplitude. No significant variation has been found in the timespan of our simulations when changing the inclination angle between the rotation axis and the direction of the infalling gas, while different velocity profiles can slightly alter the extent of the stellar disc and the rotational amplitude. The results of our simulations illustrate the complex link between dynamical and chemical properties of multiple populations and provide new elements for the interpretation of observational studies and future investigations of the dynamics of multiple-population GCs.


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